Bringing people back to the open web - Chris Hardie
The average Internet user isn't aware of (or doesn't care) about the principles of an "open web" in those terms. It's up to developers, designers, entrepreneurs and technology leaders to create a version of the open web that also happens to be the best version of the web.
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Instead, it's up to the developers, designers, entrepreneurs and technology leaders to create a version of the open web that also happens to be the best version of the web.

There is something about this that rubs me the wrong way. Designers and developers are not enough, because they build software but don't have time or resources to promote and support the usage of that software. Entrepreneurs and "technology leaders" are then left to make this open web a reality for the masses, but who are these people supposed to be? What is their motivation? If it is personal profit, how do you make that congruent with free and open source platforms? If it is not personal profit, what institutions do these people support and how are they funded? These are the questions that really need to be answered.
  
Good questions.

If it is personal profit, how do you make that congruent with free and open source platforms?


I guess I would point to Automattic as a workable example of this. Of course, I don't know if that same model can be duplicated for something like Hubzilla but it certainly would be nice.
  
There are definitely examples of FOSS success stories out there. Linux. Mozilla. Wordpress. Nextcloud. I think I'm being harsh about the article because over the years it has become clear to me that the big issues around software freedom (which is really just another facet of "liberty") are fundamentally no different than many other important problems that need solving. Most people come at this naturally from a perspective of software as a consumer product that is selected off the shelf by consumers based on its appeal and, by assumption, its merit. While this capitalist approach has generated many positive things in terms of wealth and comfort and innovations in our world, it has numerous downsides too. My point is that, instead of framing the issue of software freedom and the "open web" in terms of this system in which it will more often than not lose to "the competition", we should discuss what kind of institutions we want to foster as a society in order to make thriving, ubiquitous FOSS a reality. If we cannot articulate what needs to change about our culture and institutions to allow FOSS to flourish, then we will have to hope that the current trajectory will somehow work in the long term. Personally I'm not holding my breath.